Vibration vs. Other Welding Methods

Vibration vs. Infrared Welding

VIBRATION WELDING

INFRARED WELDING

Faster cycle times:

  • 8 to 15 seconds typical.
Slower cycle times:

  • 20 to 60 seconds typical.
Cannot weld tall, thin, non-supported either:  a) inside walls or b) outside walls perpendicular to the direction of vibration. Can weld tall, thin, non-supported inside and outside walls.
Process works well for a variety of applications (some limitations). Process works well for a variety of materials (few limitations).
Can be difficult to weld VERY large parts. Almost no part size limitations.
Lower joint strength with Polypropylene and Polyethylene due to absorption of vibration within the material instead of transfer to the joint area. Higher joint strength with Polypropylene and Polyethylene as the process heats the interface without friction.
Process can join certain dissimilar materials (limited number). Process can join certain dissimilar materials (limited number).
Can weld parts with contours in one direction only. Can weld parts with contours in both directions.
Weld plane limited to 10° maximum from flat in the axis parallel to vibration. Weld plane limited to 45° maximum from flat plane.
Lower tooling costs (no infrared platen required). Higher tooling costs (requires infrared platen).
Less complex tooling. Process requires an infrared platen assembly.
Lower tooling maintenance. Infrared platen maintenance; periodic replacement of infrared emitters required.
Faster tooling change-over times. No platen to change. Slower tooling change-over times; may have to change infrared platen.
Process can create flash that can break off causing loose particles (application and material dependant). Process creates solid, smooth flash bead with virtually no particulate.
Virtually no smoke or fumes during welding process. Process most often will create smoke and fumes.

Vibration Welding vs. Hot Plate Welding

VIBRATION WELDING

HOT PLATE WELDING

Faster cycle times:

  • 8 to 15 seconds typical.
Slower cycle times:

  • 15 to 45 seconds (high temp) typical.
  • 30 to 60 seconds (low temp) typical.
Cannot weld tall, thin, non-supported either:  a) inside walls or b) outside walls perpendicular to the direction of vibration. Can weld tall, thin, non-supported inside and outside walls.
No direct control of temperature at weld joint. Direct control of temperature at weld joint.
Process works well for a variety of applications (some limitations). Process works well for a variety of materials (few limitations).
Easy welding of Nylon. Complex to weld Nylon.  Involves ultra high-temperature heat platen cores which must be scrubbed with metal brushes every cycle to clean off build-up of residual material. Yields the strongest bonds compared to most other welding methods.
Can be difficult to weld VERY large parts. Almost no part size limitations.
Lower joint strength with Polypropylene and Polyethylene due to absorption of vibration within the material instead of transfer to the joint area. Higher joint strength with Polypropylene and Polyethylene as the process heats the interface without friction.
Fillers in the material are not a problem. Fillers in the material can build up on the heat platen requiring periodic cleaning (automatic cleaning systems are available on certain models).
Process can join certain dissimilar materials (limited number). Process can join certain dissimilar materials (limited number).
Can weld parts with contours in one direction only. Can weld parts with contours in both directions.
Weld plane limited to 10° maximum from flat in the axis parallel to vibration. Weld plane limited to 45° maximum from flat plane.
More sensitive to molded part variations. Less sensitive to molded part variations.
Higher initial capital equipment costs. Lower initial capital equipment costs.
Lower tooling costs (no heat platen required). Higher tooling costs (requires heat platen).
Less complex tooling. Process requires a heat platen assembly.
Lower tooling maintenance. Heat platen maintenance; replace heaters and Teflon inserts when using low temperature.
Faster tooling change-over times. Slower tooling change-over times; also may have to change heat platen and allow for heat up.
Process can create flash that can break off causing loose particles (application and material dependant). Process creates solid, smooth flash bead with virtually no particulate.
Virtually no smoke or fumes during welding process. Virtually no smoke or fumes during welding process at low temp; will create smoke and fumes when welding at high temp.
Lower power consumption (no heat platen heaters). Higher power consumption (required for heaters).